car dealer school for the wholesale car collector

we travel the coast

from santa rosa to santa barbara

up and down beautiful highway 101

we are the largest

car dealer school in california

licensed since 1998

the only car dealer school

taught by real car dealers

come and see what

getting licensed is all about

SANTA ROSA

NOVATO

SAN FRANCISCO

SAN MATEO

SAN JOSE

SALINAS

SAN LUIS OBISPO

SANTA BARBARA

small classes

#realcardealerschool

800-901-5950

GOTPLATES.COM

dlr plate

redstar

central valley dmv certified car dealer license training from gotplates.com

dmv requires a training class to take your car dealer license examination

dmv requires you pass a 40 question exam to submit your car dealer license application

we teach the required dmv license certification class in more places than anyone else

find out why our competition struggles to match our offer

could it be better value??

could it be better pricing??

could it be our dedication to customer service??

we like to think it is all three

visit our website to see our entire class schedule

http://gotplates.com/

joseph is our car dealer license instructor in the central valley

415-730-3131

we have a classes in fresno, bakersfield and modesto every month

http://gotplates.com/cities.php?city=Fresno

http://gotplates.com/cities.php?city=Bakersfield

http://gotplates.com/cities.php?city=Modesto

good luck with getting your car dealer license

central coast dmv certified car dealer license training

dmv requires a training class to take your car dealer license examination

dmv requires you pass a 40 question exam to submit your car dealer license application

we teach the required dmv license certification class in more places than anyone else

find out why our competition struggles to match our offer

could it be better value??

could it be better pricing??

could it be our dedication to customer service??

we like to think it is all three

visit our website to see our entire class schedule

http://gotplates.com/

joseph is our car dealer license instructor on the central coast

415-730-3131

we have a classes in aptos, salinas, san luis obisbo and santa barbara every month

http://gotplates.com/cities.php?city=Aptos

http://gotplates.com/cities.php?city=Salinas

http://gotplates.com/cities.php?city=San%20Luis%20Obisbo

http://gotplates.com/cities.php?city=Santa%20Barbara

good luck with getting your car dealer license

modesto dmv car dealer school is now offered in spanish

we are the leaders in

dmv certified car dealer education

gotplates.com

800-901-5950

in response to high demand

we are now offering a spanish language car dealer class

in modesto at crows landing for those who prefer a spanish teacher

we offer a downloadable spanish handbook after the class

Click here for Crows Landing class dates

you may call the instructor direct

Jorge Elizalde

El Tio Auto Sales

209-538-1789

got1

CSLEA…..working behind the scenes

CSLEA Board & Officers

Alan Barcelona
CSLEA President
[Special Agent DOJ]
Tina Brazil Kenneth Ehrman – AMVIC Francine Toth Ricardo Sanchez
Senior Vice President
Unit C Vice President
CHP-PSDA President
[Dispatcher CHP]
Unit A Vice President
AMVIC President
[Investigator DMV]
Unit B Vice President
COLRE President
[LRE DMV]
CSLEA Chief Financial Officer
CALEE President
[Investigator DMV]
Bernadette Gonzalez Steve Bradley John Miller – AC-DOJ Jim Kastner – ACE
CSLEA Secretary
[LRE DMV]
Sergeant-At-Arms
SEFFA President
[Firefighter/Security Officer –
State Military Dept
]
 Board Member
[Senior Criminalist]
Board Member
[Conservationist II]
Marcus Nenn – ADC Terry Beatty – AMCOS Kevin Highbaugh OPEN – ASA-DOJ
Board Member
[DIS REP II/DIV C&S] 
 Board Member
[Motor Carrier Specialist CHP] 
Board Member
CASI President
[Agent ABC]
 Board Member
Frank Capetillo – CACI George Tiongson – CAFDI Paul San Gregorio – CAFI Tom Ineichen – CARII
 Board Member
[Investigator]
 Board Member
[Investigator]
Board Member
[Special Investigator]
 Board Member
[STR PST CNT BD SP] 
Bill Bondshu – FMESA Luis Jimenez – HPAC OPEN – RPPOA
 Board Member
[Coordinator] 
 Board Member
[Hospital Police Officer]
  Board Member

curbstoners often sell dangerous cars

Financial Cost:
Curbstoners Put Dangerous Cars On Your Roads
As this case shows, many of the cars sold by curbstoners are vehicles
that have been written off by insurance companies and sold for parts.
Curbstoners sometimes weld together pieces from several separate
wrecks to create one running vehicle. To hide the fact that a car was
salvaged, curbstoners engage in “title washing:” registering the car in
various states until the “salvage” notation on its title vanishes.
Alternately, a curbstoner may simply register the car out-of-state
and then quickly sell the car before the paperwork catches up.
Whether the vehicle is salvaged or was simply rejected by legitimate
dealers due to problems,
the bottom line is these
homemade vehicles are
unpredictable and dangerous.
Faulty braking, steering, and
computer systems can cause
horric collisions. Fundamental
passenger protection
equipment, such as seat belt pre-tensioners or airbags, may
be damaged, improperly installed, or missing altogether. Airbag
modules, in particular, have been known to be stuffed with old
newspapers or bedsheets before being re-sealed and installed.
Vehicles sold by curbstoners are, all too often, accidents waiting
to happen – on your streets, requiring the deployment of your
emergency response resources.

car dealers…..is your red flag ITPP current ??

+++++

ITPP = identity theft protection program

required of all car dealers offering credit as of jan 1, 2011

+++++

SACRAMENTO – Attorney General Kamala D. Harris today announced the creation of the Privacy Enforcement and Protection Unit in the Department of Justice which will focus on protecting consumer and individual privacy through civil prosecution of state and federal privacy laws.

“In the 21st Century, we share and store our most sensitive personal information on phones, computers and even the cloud. It is imperative that consumers are empowered to understand how these innovations use personal information so that we can all make informed choices about what information we want to share,” said Attorney General Harris. “The Privacy Unit will police the privacy practices of individuals and organizations to hold accountable those who misuse technology to invade the privacy of others.”

The California Constitution guarantees all people the inalienable right to privacy. The Privacy Unit will protect this constitutionally-guaranteed right by prosecuting violations of California and federal privacy laws. The Privacy Unit centralizes existing Justice Department efforts to protect privacy, including enforcing privacy laws, educating consumers and forging partnerships with industry and innovators.

The Privacy Unit’s mission to enforce and protect privacy is broad. It will enforce laws regulating the collection, retention, disclosure, and destruction of private or sensitive information by individuals, organizations, and the government. This includes laws relating to cyber privacy, health privacy, financial privacy, identity theft, government records and data breaches. By combining the various privacy functions of the Department of Justice into a single enforcement and education unit with privacy expertise, California will be better equipped to enforce state privacy laws and protect citizens’ privacy rights.

The Privacy Unit will reside in the eCrime Unit and will be staffed by Department of Justice employees, including six prosecutors who will concentrate on privacy enforcement. Joanne McNabb, formerly of the California Office of Privacy Protection, will serve as the Director of Privacy Education and Policy, and will oversee the Privacy Unit’s education and outreach efforts.

Protecting the privacy of Californians is one of Attorney General Harris’s top priorities. The creation of the Privacy Enforcement and Protection Unit follows the forging of an industry agreement among the nation’s leading mobile and social application platforms to improve privacy protections for consumers around the globe who use apps on their smartphones, tablets, and other electronic devices. The platform companies who signed on to that agreement — Amazon.com Inc., Apple Inc., Facebook, Google Inc., Hewlett-Packard Company, Microsoft Corporation and Research in Motion Limited — agreed to privacy principles designed to bring the industry in line with California law requiring apps that collect personal information to post a privacy policy and to promote transparency in the privacy practices of apps.

Attorney General Harris established the eCrime Unit in 2011 to prosecute identity theft, data intrusions, and crimes involving the use of technology. The eCrime Unit provides investigative and prosecutorial support to the five California regional high-tech task forces funded through the High Technology Theft Apprehension and Prosecution Trust Fund Program and provides coordination for out-of-state technology-crime investigation requests. The eCrime Unit also develops and provides training for law enforcement officers, prosecutors, the judiciary and the public on cyber safety and the importance of strong information-security practices.

The February 2012 press release announcing the apps agreement can be found here:http://oag.ca.gov/news/press-releases/attorney-general-kamala-d-harris-secures-global-agreement-strengthen-privacy

The June 2012 press release announcing that Facebook joined the apps agreement can be found here: http://oag.ca.gov/news/press-releases/attorney-general-kamala-d-harris-announces-expansion-california%E2%80%99s-consumer

The December 2011 press release announcing the creation of the eCrime Unit can be found here: http://oag.ca.gov/news/press-releases/attorney-general-kamala-d-harris-announces-creation-ecrime-unit-targeting

# # #

got broker ???…..get louie bookout…..CBS

Los Angeles is filled with the world’s most fascinating jobs. It is the mecca of the entertainment industry where you can find yourself at a bar having a drink next to some really interesting people. From models to aspiring actors, musicians, agents, chauffeurs, personal assistants, all provide the backdrop to amazing stories. There is one person that truly has the most interesting job. Meet Louie Bookout.

 

Louie Bookout of Celebrity Business Services

Starting Small but Dreaming Big

Most people first met Louie Bookout on Bravo’s Million Dollar Listings when he delivered a Mercedes to the house of celebrity Real Estate Broker Chad Rogers. What most viewers didn’t know is that Louie Bookout has been providing elite Los Angeleans hard-to-find luxury cars for years.

Bookout began his company, Celebrity Business Services, 17 years ago. Celebrity Business Services is a thriving private car dealer in a world where the words car dealer and thriving are almost never used in the same sentence. It has been nearly 30 years since Bookout came to Los Angeles to make some quick money in order to get another business started. He left the business for a short time, only to return when he realized he loved working in the car industry. Bookout began his auto sales career working at a Mercedes dealership. He started as a sales representative, moved on to sales manager, then was in line for a general manager. He dreamed of owning his own dealership someday.

One of the buyers at Bookout’s dealership was an auto broker, meaning he was a middle man between the dealership and car buyers. Many of the broker’s clients were in the entertainment industry. Bookout noticed this man did not always seem happy, and was many times very grumpy. Even while grumpy, he still managed to sell 20 cars per month. “He was selling 20 cars a month, I figured that if I was doing the same thing, with a better attitude, I could sell 40 cars a month.” Today, in the midst of a tough economy, Bookout is doing just that. He estimates he sells approximately 40 to 50 cars per month. The cars he provides range from MercedesBMWs, and Bentleys, toRolls-Royce and Range Rovers. His clients are generally in the entertainment industry, from actors and actresses to agents, business managers, and accountants to the stars. It is safe to assume that Bookout’s rolodex is a who’s who of Hollywood’s Power Players.

Servicing Hollywood’s A-List

With that kind of client list, one would expect not to have many headaches over business. And there aren’t. “Many of my clients have business managers or accountants that handle where the money is going. The biggest hurdles are when I get a referral from one of my clients and the new client isn’t as established and they don’t have handlers yet. They still handle all of there own financial responsibilities. Many times those people don’t use me the way they need to.” Bookout looks out for his clients’ best interests. He will give them advice to help figure out what is the best deal for them. He also looks out for his relationships and his client list is very private. He guards that list like a lion and won’t dish any celebrity dirt. The only way to know if a person is a client of Bookout’s is if the car has his customized logo of a B with wings attached on the license plate holder. In one way he has built a brand, but also an elite club that few have access to.

No Advertising Necessary

From his first client to today, Louie still has never done any advertising or marketing. You won’t find a web site containing information about Celebrity Buying Services. You  won’t even find his office hours posted anywhere because he doesn’t have specific times that he works. Everything is word of mouth. He estimates that his retention rate is approximately 85%. It is the “Louie process” that sells. Clients simply call and request the type of car that they want. They may tell him certain options they prefer, whether or not they exist. From there Bookout handles everything. He finds the car whether it is in Los Angeles, or Cleveland, and coaches his clients on cost and financing options. He handles all of the paperwork, and in the end, delivers the car to their home or office. All of this service at no additional cost to his customer. For that he relies on his relationships with the dealerships.

There are only a handful of private car dealers such as Louie’s Bookout’s Celebrity Buying Services and Bookout is the only one who sells nationwide. While he calls Los Angeles home, he has clients in New York, Miami, Tennessee, and is even making a name for himself with elite casino executives in Las Vegas.

Bookout feels blessed with the success that Celebrity Buying Services has had and has maintained over a 17 year period. He knows he is fortunate that he doesn’t have to wake up and go to a dealership every morning. “The world is my dealership” is what Bookout says. He can research and get information over the internet. With technology today, all that is needed is a cell phone, fax machine, and the internet. The biggest reason for his success is because he has followed the path of doing what he loves. “Do what you love to do. If you took money out of the equation, what would you want to do for a living?” Bookout pondered that question and followed that path, learning he indeed could make a living out of doing what he loved.

current list of dmv certified car dealer license schools

DMV Dealer Education Providers

Dealer education providers listed by type of class offered area (served) and name.
Area and
Type of Class Offered
Online/Home Study Continuing Education title Bay Area title Northern Area title Central Area title Southern Area title Provider
**X Auto Support Group
Phone: 1-714-588-1511
Email: E2000perez@yahoo.com
X Best Solutions
Phone: 1-619-546-4064
X X X X X Motorsports Market On-Line Courses, Live Classes and Home Study
Phone: 1-800-980-1967
Internet: www.motorsportsmarket.com
X X X X X Automotive Systems Analysis
Phone: 1-800-564-0984
Internet: www.autosystemsanalysis.com
X X X X X TriStar Motors, LLC
Phone: 1-800-901-5950
Internet: www.gotplates.com
X X 24-7 Dealer Training Specialists
Phone: 1-951-833-8398
Internet: www.24-7dealerclass.com
X X California Auto Dealer Education
Phone: 1-661-871-3311
Internet: www.cadeclasses.com
X Central Valley Dealers
Licensing Renewal Service
Phone: 1-209-333-0900
Email: chuckwentland@aol.com
X Superior Vehicle Dealer Training Institute
Phone: 1-949-305-8402
Internet: www.superiorbonds.com
X X Inland Empire/Orange County Dealer School
Phone: 1-909-880-1380
Internet: www.bigcardealer.com
X X X Dealer Training Experts of Northern California
Phone: 1-408-910-3876
Internet: www.dealersclass.com
X X X X X Dealer Intel
Phone: 1-415-613-4754
Internet: www.dealerintel.com
X X X X X $85 Dealer Education
Phone: 1-951-541-8390
Internet: www.waynesinsurance.com
X X X X Los Angeles Dealer School
Phone: 1-310-227-6920
Internet: www.dealerclass.com
*X Dealer License Seminars of San Diego
Phone: 1-619-665-6440
Internet: www.dealerseminars.com
X X X X X Golden State Educational Services
Phone: 1-916-395-7004
Internet: www.goldenstateeducation.com
X X Dealer Lessons
Phone: 1-877-772-3332
Internet: www.dealerlessons.com
X X X X X Dealer Education Services
Phone: 1-888-323-0031
Internet: www.dealereducation.com
X X Coffer Dealer Education
Phone: 1-888-694-1444
Internet: www.cofferdealereducation.com
X Cesar Carrascos Dealer Licensing Seminars
Phone: 1-619-474-0477
Internet: www.carrascogroup.com
X Colby Learning Center of San Diego
Phone: 1-619-559-5748
Email: colbylearning@aol.com
X X Dealers Support Group
Phone: 1-818-758-9951
Internet: www.dealerssupport.com
X Online Auto Dealer ED
Phone: 1-877-724-6150
Internet: www.onlineautodealered.com
X California Accredited Dealer Education
Phone: (714) 300-4148
Email:: cadeclass@aol.com

*Prelicensing only
**Continuing Education only

Last updated: 07/23/2012

one illinois wholesale car dealer license pitch is officially a scam and now operating in indiana under a new name

the illinois secretary of state has taken action against

one of many wholesale car dealer license scheme operators

with a massive fine

here is the certified cease and desist order against

http://www.dealerauctionaccess.com

( net worth exceeds $ 1m dollars )

from illinois

+++++

they have returned under a new name in indiana

BEWARE OF MAURICIO

The idea for Dealer License Group Inc. emerged because we recognized a need to streamline the process of dealer licensing.

The DLG team came together in 2007 as Dealer Auction Access, and changed names to Dealer License Group in 2012.  Since then, we have helped license Thousands of individuals from all walks of life!  These individuals have transformed their passion for automobiles into a lucrative and honest means of living.  In essence, they get to do what they love!

In four facilities we now host over 600 dealers with room for hundreds more. As it stands we are the largest host of wholesale licenses in the State of Indiana by more than three times of our next competitor.

We establish a physical office for you in one of our facilities. This office space establishes your business identity in Indiana and therefore qualifies you to apply for a license.

Ownership and management of the company has come from the corporate world, with over 30 years of experience in Auto Sales, Banking, Finance, Marketing and Commercial Real Estate.

This experience has allowed us to navigate through the rules and regulations required to comply with all of the regulations that are necessary to lawfully operate. Our goal is to assist, empower, and help businesses flourish in the auto auction business.

In today’s tough economy, we provide the tools needed to start or increase your business; the only thing you need to bring to the table is your passion for cars!

Dealer License Group is at the forefront of the dealer licensing industry with innovative services and products to help our dealers with exporting, shipping, buying and networking. Our mission is to help you succeed and to turn that passion for automobiles into a way to work for yourself with endless potential.

+++++

Company Name: DEALER LICENSE GROUP, INC.
Status: Active Filing Date: 11/08/2007
Entity Type: For-Profit Domestic Corporation File Number: 2007110900039
Filing State: Indiana (IN)
Company Age: 5 Years, 9 Months
Principal Address:
760 W Main Street
Bloomfield, IN 47424
Lookup Address on Google Maps
Registered Agent:
Mauricio Kiglies
760 W Main Street
Bloomfield, IN 47424
Lookup Address on Google Maps

+++++

they appear to also operate

http://dealerlicense.biz

Frequently Asked Questions:

Do I Have to Move or Change my ID’s to qualify to have a Dealer license? 
Not at all!  We are a nationwide company and  our dealer program is set up so you will qualify without having to be a resident of any state in particular.  In fact all of our customers are spread out through out the US.  By joining our program we will take care of all physical requirements all you have to do is Sign Up!

Am I a Member of Your License or some LLC?
No, we help you establish a corporation with the name of your choice and everything we do for you is on your name.   Once all your documents are set up we turn it over to you and you can use your license and corporation at your discretion.

Are There Any Dealer Insurance Requirements?
Yes, Garage Liability insurance and a bond are required for licensing.   With DL.Biz insurance is easy too! We will guide you through the insurance process and refer you to a trusted insurance company whose goal is to help you!    Quotes can vary depending on your driving record, where you live and experience.   Call and speak with one of our license professionals to find out approximately how much yours will be.

How Long Does the Application Process Take?
DL.Biz will do all the paperwork for you and prepare all docs and applications for you to sign.  Once your application is submitted it will take 21 business days to be approved and you will be a dealer!

Do I Have to Come To Indiana?
No, but you are welcome to visit! While we do host your license in one of our office faculties  in Indiana, you are not required to come in person.

How do I get my mail?
As a part of our service we have all your mail forwarded to the address of your choice – Free of charge!

For any questions not covered here feel free to call us at 866-319-0233 or email your question to Info@DealerLicense.Biz

+++++

+++++

+++

+

operating a car dealer license in california requires a california car dealer license

come see us and get licensed

gotplates.com

800-901-5950

 

wholesale car dealer licensing by proxy may be legal in indiana but that will never ever fly in california ( its the nexus issue )

it is true

as a licensed car dealer

you may sell in all 50 states

BUT

dmv regulations in california

along with the state board of equalization guidelines

clearly state:

IF YOUR NEXIS IS WITHIN CALIFORNIA

YOU MUST BE A LICENSED CALIFORNIA CAR DEALER

+++++

DMV Place of Business Inspection

After you have arranged an appointment with an Occupational Licensing Inspector he or she will inspect the place of business where the dealer conducts business.

  • The office of the principal place of business and each location of the dealership must be established to the extent that its construction is not temporary, transitory, or mobile in nature, except that a trailer coach office is acceptable providing it is not part of the dealer’s vehicle inventory being offered for or subject to sale while being used as an office of the dealership and otherwise meets the requirements of the Vehicle Code. The place of business is a place actually occupied either continuously or at regular periods by the dealer. Section 320, CVC.
  • Inspect all books and records pertinent to the business. CVC Section 320 (a)CVC Section 1670, and CVC Section 1671 and CCR Title 13, Section 270.00, 270.02, 270.04 and 272.00

out of state car dealers operating at a location in california are illegal

you residency and voter status could impact the nexus argument

DMV CAR DEALER ATTORNEY

+++++

You have a representative who operates under your authority to sell or take orders in California for any goods
or merchandise. (See California Revenue and Taxation Code section 6203(c)(2).)
Example: Your company does not have inventory in California or employees who sell in this state. Instead, you
use an independent representative who sells your product along with many others. The representative works
on a commission-only basis.

+++++

Court decisions
To look up court decisions on nexus (engaged in business) issues, see: www.findlaw.com/casecode/index.html.

+++++

Who is Liable for California Use Taxes?

Persons who are “engaged in business” in California (as defined by Revenue and Taxation Code section 6203) are responsible for collecting and remitting the sales or use taxes on all sales of tangible personal property (unless the transaction is otherwise exempt). Circumstances where a retailer is considered to be engaged in business in California, commonly referred to as “nexus,” for sales and use tax purposes include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Maintaining, occupying or using any type of office, sales room, warehouse or other place of business in California. This includes use that is temporary, indirect or through an agent or other representative.
  • Having any kind of representative operating in the state for the purpose of taking orders, making sales or deliveries, installing, or assembling tangible personal property.
  • Making repairs or providing maintenance or service to property sold, whether by employees, agents or other representatives.
  • Deriving rentals from a lease of tangible personal property located in California.

+++++

California seller’s permit requirements–dealers, wholesalers, and brokers
Dealers and wholesalers
The BOE requires motor vehicle dealers and wholesalers to register for a seller’s permit. When you sell or lease
vehicles, merchandise, or other tangible personal property in California, even temporarily, you are required to hold
a seller’s permit. If you hold a seller’s permit you must report and pay sales and use tax due on your returns.
Brokers
A broker is a retailer if you have the power to transfer title to property, and exercises it, either:
• By holding title to the property before its sale,
• By completing a bill of sale to the buyer under power of attorney from the legal owner, or
• By getting a signed bill of sale from the legal owner and delivering it to the buyer.
When entering any transactions in which you have the power to transfer title to a vehicle, you are a retailer in those
transactions, and must hold a seller’s permit.
A true broker’s authority, however, is limited to getting offers from potential buyers and conveying the offers to
vehicle owners for their acceptance. As a true broker, you are not liable for the tax, and not required to hold a seller’s
permit. In transactions in which buyers deal with a true broker, the buyer will be liable for use tax.
Note: As a broker, you may collect the use tax due on a purchase of a vehicle, as a convenience to your customer.
If you collect the use tax from a buyer and provide a receipt, you (the broker), not the buyer, are liable for the use
tax amount paid and must pay that amount to the BOE. If the BOE later discovers that additional use tax is due, the
buyer is liable for the additional tax. This procedure allows financing the tax in the purchase price of the vehicle and
helps avoid future misunderstandings about the buyer’s use tax liability.
Buyers; be sure to keep a receipt for any use tax paid to a broker.
If a broker provides this service, they must forward the use tax to the BOE with a statement that shows:
• Name and address of buyer
• Full purchase price of vehicle
• The vehicle identification number (VIN)
You can report your purchases subject to use tax by using eRegistration available on our website at www.
boe.ca.gov. eReg is also available in our field offices. Please contact our Taxpayer Information Section for assistance
at 800-400-7115.

+++++

HERE ARE SOME ANSWERS FROM THE INDIANA FOLKS

offering wholesale dealer licenses without having a nexus in california

Requirements:

  • -Indiana Wholesale Offices is an approved facility by the Indiana Secretary of State to host wholesale car dealers. Our facility provides you with a furnished office that exceeds the state requirements
  • -All individuals must have a valid Social Security Number and a valid Government Issued Identification.
  • -Wholesalers are required to sell 120 vehicles per licensing year.
  • -You do not need to be an Indiana State Resident. Having a physical business address at the Indiana Wholesale Offices facility complies with the Indiana Secretary of State physical requirements.
  • -We provide to you the expertise to gain your wholesale dealers license on the first attempt. We have a 100% approval rating for our applicants. No licenses have been denied once we process the paperwork.

Can’t afford the insurance or the bond ?

Get a Salvage License and you still can get into the auctions to buy Salvage Titled Vehicles.

If you are interested click here

+++++

like most things in life

if it is too good to be true

it is probably a lie or illegal

dont fall for any car dealer license scheme

come to the leader in california

car dealer education

gotplates.com

800-901-5950

learn the auction game from ADESA car dealer auto auction

ADESA Offers you more than one way to purchase vehicles. Visit one of our auction locations, or buy online.

We have two types of online vehicle auctions:

    • Bid now auctions take place on ADESA OpenLane. These special events are scheduled in advance and have set start and end times. At the end of the time period, the highest bid wins.
  • ADESA LiveBlock lets you bid against other dealers who are physically at a live auction. With our real-time audio visual feeds, it’s a great way to attend a car auction online, without leaving your office or home.

But there’s more—if neither of these online vehicle auctions work for you, you can still buy cars 24/7 for a set sale price with our buy now feature on OpenLane.

New to ADESA? Register now to access Bid or Buy on ADESA.com.
Already a registered user? Log in to use Bid or Buy on ADESA.com

car dealer application for auction access

Dealer Registration Forms

ADESA auctions are for registered wholesale automotive dealers only, closed to the public. Each dealer has to be registered at an ADESA auction before receiving a bid badge or buying cars online.

Below you will find a series of Web pages, links and printable files that will assist you with the process of registering at your local ADESA Auction facility. Several of these files have been created with Adobe Acrobat for security reasons. To view these files you must have Adobe Acrobat Viewer installed on your computer. If you do not have this program you candownload a free version. These files may also be obtained at your local ADESA auction.

In addition to completing and submitting the required dealer registration forms listed below, please provide copies of the following documents:

  • State dealer’s license or equivalent required state document
  • Current dealer bond, if required by your state
  • Current sales tax certificate
  • Copy of a voided company business check
  • Current salesperson’s license for each representative, if required by your state

Each representative will need to go to the Dealer Registration counter at one of our auctions to have their current driver’s license scanned into Auction ACCESS. If the representative plans to buy online only, please provide a legible copy of their current driver’s license.

ALL of the ADESA and Auction ACCESS forms listed below are required in order to register and participate either online or at any of our U.S. whole car auctions.

Required ADESA Forms:

MTC (Uniform Sales & Use Tax Certificate)
Personal Guaranty
Power of Attorney
Title Handling Form
IRS W-9 Form
US Auction Policy (Terms & Conditions)
NAAA Arbitration Policy
ADESA As-Is Policy
ADESA Post Sale Inspection Policy

Required Auction Access Forms:

Please download the following forms from the Auction Access website.

  • Application
  • Bank Authorization Letter
  • Dealership Credit Information Form
  • Individual Authorization Letter
  • Dealer Authorization/Removal Letter

After completing the documents, please fax or mail them to the dealer registration department at one of the ADESA auctions you would like to attend. You can obtain address, phone and fax contact information using the ADESA Auction List.

manheim market reporting ( MMR ) for car dealers goes mobile

Manheim Expands Mobile Services

myMobile 4 color logo

Stay on top of your business with the latest mobile features from Manheim. To experience on-the-go convenience of some of the site’s most popular features, go to www.manheim.com from any mobile device, or download the Manheim app for iPhone® and Android™.

The New and Improved Manheim App

With the full Manheim set of tools at your fingertips, you can always find the vehicle you need, no matter where you are. New features include:

Apple App Store logo

  • Scan a VIN, get the MMR.
  • Full vehicle search.
  • Bid, Buy Now, or Make an Offer.
  • Simulcast proxy bidding.
  • CarFax, AutoCheck, and condition reports.

Android Market logo

To download the new Manheim app, just search “Manheim” in the App StoreSM or Android Marketplace, or scan the QR code at right.

Get the Condition Information You Need Right on Your Mobile Device!

Now, you can view condition reports and seller disclosure information with ease from your phone, iPad, or other web-enabled device. With condition reports and seller disclosure information optimized for mobile use, you can:

Manheim app store QR code

  • Access vehicle condition information anytime, anywhere.
  • Get all of the information you need to make smart business decisions.
  • See the exact same information you expect to see on desktop reports.

Did You Know?

A 2009 study of dealers’ mobile Internet use inspired Manheim to develop a variety of mobile services to help you source and manage pre-owned inventory anywhere your business takes you. Other recently-enhanced mobile features include:

  • Manheim Market Report (MMR): Offering a faster, free and simplified version of Internet MMR for dealers using handheld mobile devices.
  • Mobile Search allows you to easily search Manheim’s entire online and in-lane inventory.
  • Remote access to the mobile version of My Workbook enables you to review all previously saved searches and to save new vehicles.

get the car dealer forms catalog from jody the forms lady

Free Catalog Request Form

Please complete the following form to receive our Free Catalog.
We will ship it to you as soon as we get your information.

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san francisco bay area dmv certified car dealer license training

dmv requires a training class to take your car dealer license examination

dmv requires you pass a 40 question exam to submit your car dealer license application

we teach the required dmv license certification class in more places than anyone else

find out why our competition struggles to match our offer

could it be better value??

could it be better pricing??

could it be our dedication to customer service??

we like to think it is all three

visit our website to see our entire class schedule

http://gotplates.com/

joseph is our car dealer license instructor in san francisco

415-730-3131

michael is our car dealer license instructor in fremont

714-797-5780

we have a classes in san francisco, novato, walnut creek, fairfield,

santa rosa, campbell, fremont, redwood city and pleasanton every month

http://gotplates.com/cities.php?city=Campbell

http://gotplates.com/cities.php?city=Fairfield

http://gotplates.com/cities.php?city=Fremont

http://gotplates.com/cities.php?city=Novato

http://gotplates.com/cities.php?city=Pleasanton

http://gotplates.com/cities.php?city=Redwood%20City

http://gotplates.com/cities.php?city=San%20Francisco

http://gotplates.com/cities.php?city=Santa%20Rosa

http://gotplates.com/cities.php?city=Walnut%20Creek

good luck with getting your car dealer license

tesla amends warranty coverage to include fire damage

TESLA
November 18, 2013
The Mission of Tesla
By Elon Musk, Chairman, Product Architect & CEO
Our goal when we created Tesla a decade ago was the same as it is today: to accelerate the advent of sustainable transport by bringing compelling mass market electric cars to market as soon as possible. If we could have done that with our first product, we would have, but that was simply impossible to achieve for a startup company that had never built a car and that had one technology iteration and no economies of scale. Our first product was going to be expensive no matter what it looked like, so we decided to build a sports car, as that seemed like it had the best chance of being competitive with its gasoline alternatives.

I suspected that this could be misinterpreted as Tesla believing that there was a shortage of sports cars for rich people, so I described the three step “master plan” for getting to compelling and affordable electric vehicles in my first blog piece about our company. This was unfortunately almost entirely ignored.

In order to get to that end goal, big leaps in technology are required, which naturally invites a high level of scrutiny. That is fair, as new technology should be held to a higher standard than what has come before. However, there should also be some reasonable limit to how high such a standard should be, and we believe that this has been vastly exceeded in recent media coverage.

How Does the Tesla Model S Fire Risk Compare to Gasoline Cars?

Since the Model S went into production last year, there have been more than a quarter million gasoline car fires in the United States alone, resulting in over 400 deaths and approximately 1,200 serious injuries (extrapolating 2012 NFPA data). However, the three Model S fires, which only occurred after very high-speed collisions and caused no serious injuries or deaths, received more national headlines than all 250,000+ gasoline fires combined. The media coverage of Model S fires vs. gasoline car fires is disproportionate by several orders of magnitude, despite the latter actually being far more deadly.

Reading the headlines, it is therefore easy to assume that the Tesla Model S and perhaps electric cars in general have a greater propensity to catch fire than gasoline cars when nothing could be further from the truth.

Journalists with a deep knowledge of the car industry, such as the news editor of Automotive News, understand and attempt to rebut this notion, but they have been drowned out by an onslaught of popular and financial media seeking to make a sensation out of something that a simple Google search would reveal to be false. I would also like to express appreciation for the investigative journalists who took the time to research and write an accurate article.

The degree to which this is outrageous is described well in the above-mentioned Automotive News article. There are now substantially more than the 19,000 Model S vehicles on the road that were reported in our Q3 shareholder letter for an average of one fire per at least 6,333 cars, compared to the rate for gasoline vehicles of one fire per 1,350 cars. By this metric, you are more than four and a half times more likely to experience a fire in a gasoline car than a Model S! Considering the odds in the absolute, you are more likely to be struck by lightning in your lifetime than experience even a non-injurious fire in a Tesla.

Those metrics tell only part of the story. The far more deadly nature of a gasoline car fire deserves to be re-emphasized. Since the Model S went into production mid last year, there have been over 400 deaths and 1,200 serious injuries in the United States alone due to gasoline car fires, compared to zero deaths and zero injuries due to Tesla fires anywhere in the world.

There is a real, physical reason for this: a gasoline tank has 10 times more combustion energy than our battery pack. Moreover, the Model S battery pack also has internal firewalls between the 16 modules and a firewall between the battery pack and passenger compartment. This effectively limits the fire energy to a few percent that of a gasoline car and is the reason why Dr. Shibayama was able to retrieve his pens and papers from the glove compartment completely untouched after the recent fire (caused by a high speed impact with a tow hitch). It is also why arsonists tend to favor gasoline. Trying to set the side of a building on fire with a battery pack is far less effective.

What About Safety Overall?

Our primary concern is not for the safety of the vehicle, which can easily be replaced, but for the safety of our customers and the families they entrust to our cars. Based on the Model S track record so far, you have a zero percent chance of being hurt in an accident resulting in a battery fire, but what about other types of accidents? Despite multiple high-speed accidents, there have been no deaths or serious injuries in a Model S of any kind ever. Of course, at some point, the law of large numbers dictates that this, too, will change, but the record is long enough already for us to be extremely proud of this achievement. This is why the Model S achieved the lowest probability of injury of any car ever tested by the US government. The probability of injury is the most accurate statistical figure of merit, showing clearly that the Model S is safer in an accident than any other vehicle without exception. It is literally impossible for another car to have a better safety track record, as it would have to possess mystical powers of healing.

Further Actions

While we believe the evidence is clear that there is no safer car on the road than the Model S, we are taking three specific actions.

First, we have rolled out an over-the-air update to the air suspension that will result in greater ground clearance at highway speeds. To be clear, this is about reducing the chances of underbody impact damage, not improving safety. The theoretical probability of a fire injury is already vanishingly small and the actual number to date is zero. Another software update expected in January will give the driver direct control of the air suspension ride height transitions.

Second, we have requested that the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration conduct a full investigation as soon as possible into the fire incidents. While we think it is highly unlikely, if something is discovered that would result in a material improvement in occupant fire safety, we will immediately apply that change to new cars and offer it as a free retrofit to all existing cars. Given that the incidence of fires in the Model S is far lower than combustion cars and that there have been no resulting injuries, this did not at first seem like a good use of NHTSA’s time compared to the hundreds of gasoline fire deaths per year that warrant their attention. However, there is a larger issue at stake: if a false perception about the safety of electric cars is allowed to linger, it will delay the advent of sustainable transport and increase the risk of global climate change, with potentially disastrous consequences worldwide. That cannot be allowed to happen.

Third, to reinforce how strongly we feel about the low risk of fire in our cars, we will be amending our warranty policy to cover damage due to a fire, even if due to driver error. Unless a Model S owner actively tries to destroy the car, they are covered. Our goal here is to eliminate any concern about the cost of such an event and ensure that over time the Model S has the lowest insurance cost of any car at our price point. Either our belief in the safety of our car is correct and this is a minor cost or we are wrong, in which case the right thing is for Tesla to bear the cost rather than the car buyer.

All of these actions are taken in order to make clear the confidence we have in our product and to eliminate any misperceptions regarding the integrity of our technology and the safety of our cars.

california certified car dealer schools

DMV Dealer Education Providers

Dealer education providers are listed by the type of class offered and area served. All classes are held in a classroom unless noted in the first column.

*Pre-licensing only
**Continuing Education only
DMV has not approved any “on-line” Pre-Licensing Programs

Area and
Type of Class Offered
Online/Home Study Continuing Education title  title Northern Area title Central Area title Southern Area title Provider

X

X

X

X

X

TriStar Motors, LLC
Phone: 1–800–901–5950
Internet: www.gotplates.com

X

X

X

X

X

24–7 Dealer Training Specialists
Phone: 1–951–833–8398
Internet: www.24–7dealerclass.com

X

X

California Auto Dealer Education
Phone: 1–661–871–3311
Internet: www.cadeclasses.com

X

Central Valley Dealers Licensing Renewal Service
Licensing Renewal Service
Phone: 1–209–333–0900
Email: chuckwentland@aol.com

X

Superior Vehicle Dealer Training Institute
Phone: 1–949–305–8402
Internet: www.superiorbonds.com

X

X

Inland Empire/Orange County Dealer School
Phone: 1–909–648–0446
Internet: www.bigcardealer.com

X

X

X

Dealer Training Experts of Northern California
Phone: 1–408–910–3876
Internet: www.dealersclass.com

X

X

X

X

X

Dealer Intel
Phone: 1-415-613-4754
Internet: www.dealerintel.com

X

X

X

X

X

$85 Dealer Education
Phone: 1-951-541-8390
Internet: www.waynesinsurance.com
X

X

X

X

Los Angeles Dealer School
Phone: 1-310-227-6920
Internet: www.dealerclass.com

*X

Dealer License Seminars of San Diego
Phone: 1-619-665-6440
Internet: www.dealerseminars.com
X X

X

X

X

Golden State Educational Services
Phone: 1-916-470-4384
Internet: www.goldenstateeducation.com

X

X

X

X

X

Dealer Education Services
Phone: 1-888-323-0031
Internet: www.dealereducation.com

X

X

Coffer Dealer Education
Phone: 1-888-694-1444
Internet: www.cofferdealereducation.com

X

Cesar Carrascos Dealer Licensing Seminars
Phone: 1-619-474-0477
Internet: www.carrascogroup.com

X

X

Dealers Support Group
Phone: 1-818-758-9951
Internet: www.dealerssupport.com
X X California Accredited Dealer Education
Phone: (714) 300-4148
Email:: cadeclass@aol.com
X X X X X ATG Dealer School
Phone: 1-818-909-7912
Internet: www.atgdealerschool.com
*X Bell’s Automotive Dealer
Phone: 1-909-202-9204
Email: bell2automotive@yahoo.com

**X

Auto Support Group
Phone: 1-714-588-1511
Email: E2000perez@yahoo.com
X X Dealer Lessons
Phone: 1-877-772-3332
Internet: www.dealerlessons.com
X Online Auto Dealer Ed
Phone: 1-877-724-6150
Internet: www.onlineautodealered.com
X Colby Learning Center of San Diego
Phone: 1-619-559-5748
Email: colbylearning@aol.com
X X Modesto/Central Valley Dealer Education
Phone: 1-209-535-8910

X

Best Solutions
Phone: 1-619-546-4064

X

X

X

X

X

Motorsports Market On-Line Courses, Live Classes and Home Study
Phone: 1-800-980-1967
Internet: www.motorsportsmarket.com

X

A-1 Dealers Support Group
Phone: 1–323–781–7130
Internet: www.a1autodealerssg.com

X

X

X

X

X

Automotive Systems Analysis
Phone: 1–800–564–0984
Internet: www.autosystemsanalysis.com

X

X

X

X

X

FFW Auto Group
Phone: 1–415–644–8052
Internet: www.ffwautogroup.com

Last updated: 07/08/2014

got spanish cash contract forms ???

+++

“AS IS”

Cash Contract

Simple – SPANISH

$49.99

California Civil Code Section 2981 mandates that sales contracts be completed when a motor vehilce is sold from a licensed entitiy (dealership). All contracts need to be in writing and must be contained on a single document. The contract is designed to protect both the consumer and the dealer by clearly stating the terms of the sale. The contract must include a proper description of the vehicle, the total cost and terms of the sale, as well as the prescribed disclosures required by statue. All contracts must be completed and signed by both parties (buyer and seller). Be sure to provide a clear copy of the contract to the consmer. This form is in complete compliance with disclosures, and is to be used for Cash in house deals when no financing is applicable. 14 3/4″ x 8 1/2″ – 2-part – 100 /pkg . Printed in Spanish.
  • Model: JF730SP

EZ Dealer Bond Quote

Car Dealer Forms Starter Kit

Used Car Dealer Insurance

car dealers offering credit…..cal ag to begin red flag rules enforcement

SACRAMENTO – Attorney General Kamala D. Harris today announced the creation of the Privacy Enforcement and Protection Unit in the Department of Justice which will focus on protecting consumer and individual privacy through civil prosecution of state and federal privacy laws.

“In the 21st Century, we share and store our most sensitive personal information on phones, computers and even the cloud. It is imperative that consumers are empowered to understand how these innovations use personal information so that we can all make informed choices about what information we want to share,” said Attorney General Harris. “The Privacy Unit will police the privacy practices of individuals and organizations to hold accountable those who misuse technology to invade the privacy of others.”

The California Constitution guarantees all people the inalienable right to privacy. The Privacy Unit will protect this constitutionally-guaranteed right by prosecuting violations of California and federal privacy laws. The Privacy Unit centralizes existing Justice Department efforts to protect privacy, including enforcing privacy laws, educating consumers and forging partnerships with industry and innovators.

The Privacy Unit’s mission to enforce and protect privacy is broad. It will enforce laws regulating the collection, retention, disclosure, and destruction of private or sensitive information by individuals, organizations, and the government. This includes laws relating to cyber privacy, health privacy, financial privacy, identity theft, government records and data breaches. By combining the various privacy functions of the Department of Justice into a single enforcement and education unit with privacy expertise, California will be better equipped to enforce state privacy laws and protect citizens’ privacy rights.

The Privacy Unit will reside in the eCrime Unit and will be staffed by Department of Justice employees, including six prosecutors who will concentrate on privacy enforcement. Joanne McNabb, formerly of the California Office of Privacy Protection, will serve as the Director of Privacy Education and Policy, and will oversee the Privacy Unit’s education and outreach efforts.

Protecting the privacy of Californians is one of Attorney General Harris’s top priorities. The creation of the Privacy Enforcement and Protection Unit follows the forging of an industry agreement among the nation’s leading mobile and social application platforms to improve privacy protections for consumers around the globe who use apps on their smartphones, tablets, and other electronic devices. The platform companies who signed on to that agreement — Amazon.com Inc., Apple Inc., Facebook, Google Inc., Hewlett-Packard Company, Microsoft Corporation and Research in Motion Limited — agreed to privacy principles designed to bring the industry in line with California law requiring apps that collect personal information to post a privacy policy and to promote transparency in the privacy practices of apps.

Attorney General Harris established the eCrime Unit in 2011 to prosecute identity theft, data intrusions, and crimes involving the use of technology. The eCrime Unit provides investigative and prosecutorial support to the five California regional high-tech task forces funded through the High Technology Theft Apprehension and Prosecution Trust Fund Program and provides coordination for out-of-state technology-crime investigation requests. The eCrime Unit also develops and provides training for law enforcement officers, prosecutors, the judiciary and the public on cyber safety and the importance of strong information-security practices.

The February 2012 press release announcing the apps agreement can be found here:http://oag.ca.gov/news/press-releases/attorney-general-kamala-d-harris-secures-global-agreement-strengthen-privacy

The June 2012 press release announcing that Facebook joined the apps agreement can be found here: http://oag.ca.gov/news/press-releases/attorney-general-kamala-d-harris-announces-expansion-california%E2%80%99s-consumer

The December 2011 press release announcing the creation of the eCrime Unit can be found here: http://oag.ca.gov/news/press-releases/attorney-general-kamala-d-harris-announces-creation-ecrime-unit-targeting

# # #

zurich insurance offers 7 tips for red flag rules compliance

IF YOU OFFER CREDIT…..GET RED FLAG CERTIFIED

WITH

GOTPLATES.COM

800-901-5950

+++++

To help ensure your dealership gets and stays in compliance, Zurich insurance recommends the following seven steps:

1. Put the program in writing

Your program must contain reasonable policies and procedures to address four primary responsibilities under the rule. The rule also states that each program must be documented in writing. While potentially burdensome, this requirement has obvious advantages to the dealer. It forms the basis for the employee training that is required by the rule, and makes responding to government audits and inquiries possible.

2. Make a list of patterns, practices or specific activities that could be red flags signaling possible identity theft.

Your policies and procedures should require that you become at least reasonably certain of your customer’s buyer’s identity. A supplement to the rule on the FTC’s website provides illustrations of 26 possible red flags that fall into the following five categories:

—Receiving alerts, notifications or warnings from a consumer-reporting agency

—The customer presents suspicious documents.

—The customer presents suspicious personal identifying information, such as a suspect address.

—Dealership staff notices unusual use of or suspicious activity within an existing account.

—You receive notices from customers, victims of identity theft, law enforcement authorities or other businesses about possible identity theft in connection with an existing account.

Note, not all 26 possible red flags will be relevant to the way your dealership does business.

In particular, unless you have accounts to which customers can make charges after origination, for example, house credit accounts, the seven possible red flags in category four are not likely to apply to your dealership.

You also need to guard against identity theft risks that result from employee access to account information. Employee access should already be limited as part of your overall information security program.

3. Make a list of methods used to detect and evaluate if a red flag has occurred.

The program should describe procedures used to verify customer information and detect when information is incorrect. Some procedures include:

—Specifying acceptable forms of identifying information required of each finance customer

—Specifying procedures to verify identifying information, for example, using third-party resources to confirm identification or detect fraud

—Using a system to monitor employee compliance relative to their access and use of customer account information

4. Describe how your dealership will respond when red flags are detected.

The program must contain reasonable policies for responding to red flags detected during a transaction. This should include a procedure for escalating unresolved situations to senior management.

Some appropriate responses to unresolved red flags would be to:

—Not continue the transaction

—Use additional resources to verify the customer’s identity.

—Notify law enforcement.

—Determine that no response is warranted.

5. Document all red flag responses and keep them in the customer file.

All red flag responses should also be kept in a dealership file to be used to maintain and update the program.

6. Detail a plan to update the program periodically.

Update the program to reflect changes in risks to customers or to your dealership’s safety and security based upon:

—Your experience with identity theft

—New methods of identity theft

—New methods of identity theft prevention and detection

—Changes in the types of accounts offered or maintained by your dealership

—Changes in your dealership’s business or structure such as mergers and changes in service provider arrangements

7. Follow the Red Flags Rule guidelines in managing the program.

The rule provides for some specific administrative actions that need to take place to adequately manage your program. These include that your program must:

—Be approved and implemented by your dealership’s board of directors or, if no board exists, a designated member of the senior management team.

—Be periodically evaluated to determine if updates are necessary.

—Include training for relevant staff on their obligations under the program.

—Be able to ensure service providers have reasonable procedures to detect, prevent and mitigate the risk of identity theft.

Penalties for Violations

Penalties for violations of these regulations are stiff. These include the following:

—A “knowing” violation of the rule is a violation of the FTC Act, which provides for a $3,500 civil penalty for each violation.

—Enforcement actions by the FTC can carry penalties of up to $11,000 per violation, per day.

—Dealers may also be liable under state unfair and deceptive acts, and practices law, which may include individual and class action claims.

Additional resources from the FTC can be found here.

government records and your privacy

Government Records and Your Privacy

1. Introduction

Government records are public in order to enable citizens to monitor their government and to ensure accountability in a democratic society. The challenge to policymakers is to balance the public’s right to information with the individual’s right to privacy.

Virtually every major change in life is recorded somewhere in a government document. Shortly after you are born, a birth certificate is issued.  If you obtain a driver’s license, get married, buy a house, file a lawsuit–all of these events are recorded in public documents easily available to you and to others.

2. Public Records

Note: Most of the information in this section is specific to California.  Other states may vary in how they regulate access to public records.

Public records are just that–public. There are few, if any, restrictions on the release of this information. For example, information from public records is frequently obtained by direct marketers. (See PRC Fact Sheet 4: Junk Mail: How Did They Get My Address?) Public records may also be used by private investigators, attorneys, law enforcement officials and other government agencies. In fact, as more public records are posted online, anyone with a computer and Internet access can easily compile detailed profiles on individuals.

The most common California government records containing personal information are listed below:

Your California Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) driver’s license file contains:

  • Your name
  • Birth date
  • Home and mailing addresses
  • License number
  • Physical description
  • Social Security number
  • Failures to appear in court
  • Failures to pay traffic fines
  • License status (valid, revoked, suspended, expired)
  • Major traffic convictions for the past seven years
  • Minor traffic convictions for the past three years

The DMV also keeps files of vehicle registrations which include:

  • Name of the person who owns the vehicle
  • Residential and mailing addresses of the registered owner
  • Vehicle year, make and body style
  • Year the vehicle was bought by the current owner and previous owners’ names and addresses going back three years
  • License plate number; vehicle identification number
  • Name of the lien-holder if the loan for the vehicle has not yet been paid in full

DMV files are routinely consulted by employers, insurance companies, attorneys and private investigators. They used to be sold to marketers, but access has been restricted since 1990.

Confidential portions of your file include medical information, home address and Social Security number. Even though it is considered confidential, in some specific instances your home address can be released to insurance companies, banks, attorneys and process servers.

The DMV also releases information to “casual requesters.” However, the requester must apply to the main DMV office in Sacramento and explain the purpose of the request and potential uses of the information. Each request is reviewed by DMV to determine that the purpose of requesting the information is for a legitimate us. http://www.dmv.ca.gov/forms/inf/inf70.htm.

Your Social Security number is required to receive or renew your driver’s license.  This information is considered confidential. The law allows SSNs to be used for tax administration purposes, collecting government fines, and helping track down parents who have not made court-ordered child support payments.

The California driver’s license looks very similar to a plastic credit card with a magnetic “stripe” on the back. The “stripe” holds information which can be read by special scanners. Currently the information on the stripe is the same as the front of the license. It can be used by law enforcement officers to print traffic tickets and by retailers to record information when a customer pays by check. Some privacy advocates are concerned that the magnetic stripe makes it easier for merchants to establish computerized data banks about their customers, and thereby poses a threat to personal privacy.

In California, Civil Code 1798.90.1 prohibits bars, car dealers and others from collecting personal information by swiping the magnetic stripe for purposes other than verifying age or the authenticity of the driver’s license, or preventing fraud.

One court has ruled that the federal Driver’s Privacy Protection Act (18 U.S.C. 2721-2725) allows states to turn over their entire DMV database to certain private entities, including research companies, online database operators, grocery chains, insurance companies, employee screening services, technology businesses and consulting companies. The court held that these entities, which buy DMV records in bulk, are making a permissible use of the information.  Taylor v. Acxiom Corp.(5th Circ., July 14, 2010).

Voting records are kept at the County Clerk’s or Registrar of Voters office and at the California Secretary of State office. California voter records are available to four categories of users: election/political, scholarly, journalistic, or governmental purpose. Requesters must apply to the California Secretary of State or the county elections office for the records and must certify the purpose for their request.

The state offers the Safe at Home program to provide confidential address protection for individuals who must keep their home address private because of personal safety issues. Victims of domestic violence and stalking, employees and volunteers of reproductive health care clinics, and others whose safety is at risk can apply for the California Safe at Home program. For more information, call the California Secretary of State at (877) 322-5227, www.casafeathome.org . At least 28 states offer similar confidentiality programs (See National Network to End Domestic Violence’s list of state confidentiality programs).

Birth certificates are on file in the county in which the birth occurred and at theOffice of Vital Records in Sacramento. Birth records usually contain the name of the child, date and time of birth, the city and the hospital in which the child was born, the parents’ names, the attending physician’s name and various signatures. Birth records housed in the State Vital Records Office are public and can be ordered by anyone with sufficient identifying information (See CA State Vital Record’s explanation of Authorized Copy vs. Informational Copy). County records may be confidential and available only to the subject of the record or by court order. Confidentiality policies differ by county.

Marriage certificates are usually filed in the County Clerk’s office where the marriage application was filed and in the State Vital Records office in Sacramento. An index is available to the public. It contains the bride and groom’s names, the county where the application was filed and the date of the marriage.

In California a couple may file for a confidential marriage certificate which is not placed in the index and is not a public record. A confidential marriage license is open only to the bride and groom or by court order.

Death certificates are also public documents. They are usually kept on file in the county in which the death occurred at the County Clerk’s office. The State Registrar’s office in Sacramento also maintains these files. An index of death certificates is available to the public. It contains the name of the person who died, where the death occurred, the date and the person’s Social Security number.

Property records are open for public inspection. When you purchase a home or other real estate, a record of the transaction is made by the County Assessor’s office and the County Recorder’s office. The files maintained by the Assessor, Tax Collector and/or Recorder contain the location of the property, current owner’s name, address and previous owners’ names, dates of sale, description of the property and the approximate value of the real estate holding. These files are increasingly made available on the Internet by county government agencies and by information brokers.

Court records, unless they involve a juvenile, are usually public. Superior, municipal and small claims court records are kept in the court clerk’s office. The court clerk maintains an index of civil and criminal cases which is filed in alphabetical order by the names of the parties involved. Case files can be retrieved under the name of either the plaintiff or the defendant. They contain the initial complaint, the defendant’s answer and motions filed in the case. Case files may also contain evidence or exhibits that were used in court. Court records are increasingly available on the Internet.

A person involved in a lawsuit can ask the judge to have parts of a case file “sealed.” If the judge consents to seal parts of the record, that portion is no longer open to public viewing. In criminal cases, probation reports, medical information and psychiatric information are removed from the file before it is made available to the public.

The National Center for State Courts has information on state policies for public access to court records on its website at http://www.ncsc.org/topics/access-and-fairness/privacy-public-access-to-court-records/state-links.aspx?cat=Privacy%20Policies%20for%20Court%20Records.

Divorce records are public documents and are usually considered part of court files. They are filed at the Superior Court clerk’s office of the county in which the divorce was granted.

Arrest records are public records. They may include detailed information about the person arrested, the incident leading to the arrest and the victim. These records can be closed if their release would endanger an ongoing investigation or public safety. If the person arrested is found innocent of the charges, he or she may ask to have the record sealed and claim they have never been arrested.

Postal address information is not a matter of public record through the U.S. Postal Service (USPS). However, the information from postal Change of Address forms is available to many people. The Change of Address form carries a notice that the information you provide may be used by others. USPS assumes you have read this warning and consent to the release of your information.

If you move and fill out a Change of Address form (USPS Form 3575), the information is sold by USPS to mailing list, direct mail and credit bureau companies through its National Change of Address (NCOA) system to help mailers update their lists. However, temporary address changes are not included in the NCOA database.

If you file a Change of Address form, USPS will release your new address to those who send you first class mail at the old address for up to 12 months — shorter forwarding limits for magazines and other non-first class mail. Victims of a threatening situation can prevent the release of his or her new address by obtaining a temporary restraining order or court order and presenting it to the Postal Service.

USPS mails a confirmation of the new address to both your new and old addresses. This is a precaution in case an identity thief has fraudulently forwarded your mail to another address. See PRC’s Fact Sheets 17: Copying with Identity Theft: Reducing Your Risk of Fraud and 17a: Identity Theft: What to Do if it Happens to You.

Local post offices will release Change of Address forms to someone presenting a subpoena or court order, to a law enforcement or government official for authorized purposes, or to someone who is certified to serve legal documents.

3. Confidential Records

Some records kept by government agencies are considered confidential. For example, your tax records are private. You may have access to your Internal Revenue Service file but others do not. The following are some common government records which are confidential.

Social welfare information such as Medicare records and Social Securityinformation is generally confidential. However, social service agencies must supply a list of benefit recipients and their Social Security numbers to tax authorities.

In addition, the federal government has a computer matching program which allows agencies to compare computerized records to verify eligibility or compliance with benefit programs. This program is also used to collect debts owed to the government or unpaid child support. If you apply for benefits, you must be told that the matching program is being used. No one can be denied benefits based solely on the results of information obtained through matching.

Tax information, both federal and state, is not a public record. It is not disclosed unless:

  • The taxpayer is part of a court proceeding where tax issues are relevant
  • A government agency is trying to locate a parent who owes child support payments
  • State financial aid programs have been requested
  • It is for statistical use
  • Agencies request tax information for the purpose of tax administration

People who file joint returns have equal access to tax records. Federal law allows the Social Security Administration and the Department of Education access to tax records to withhold tax refunds if money is owed to the government.

School records are usually confidential. (See Fact Sheet 29: Privacy in Education: A Guide for Parents and Adult-Age Students.) Persons over age 18 must authorize the release of their school records before they can be viewed by others (including parents). The records of children under 18 years of age are under the control of their parents and/or guardians. The records can be releasedwithout consent only to:

  • The current school district
  • A school district to which the student is transferring
  • State or federal education authorities
  • State or federal financial aid programs
  • Law enforcement officials for “child welfare” protection
  • Or upon a judge’s order for release

Parents have the right to inspect all records a school has about their child if the child is under 18, and to request that any errors be corrected. In California, noncustodial parents and foster parents have the right to view a child’s records. However, only custodial parents may challenge its content or consent to its release. Adult students have the same rights as parents of minor students.

Schools must keep a log, open only to parents and school officials, which lists those who have received information from a student’s record and how the information was used.

The school may release directory information about students. But parents (or the student if over 18) must be notified as to the type of information to be released. Parents have the right to block the release of the information by notifying the school of their objection. Usually a notice dealing with this issue is sent home at the beginning of the school year. (See the legal citation for the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, or FERPA, at the end of this publication.)

Public library records are confidential under the California Public Records Act. All registration and circulation records of any library which receives public funds may only be disclosed for library employees to do their job, by order of a superior court, or if the person authorizes the release.

Confidential data includes information provided to receive a library card and a list of the materials that have been borrowed. Records of fines and statistical reports are not confidential. Privately-funded libraries may not have the same privacy protection as those which receive public funds. You may want to request a copy of the facility’s policies.

Criminal history information compiled by local and state criminal justice departments is not public in California. “Rap” sheets (records of arrests and prosecutions) can only be accessed by:

  • Law enforcement agencies
  • Attorneys working on a case involving the individual
  • The subject of the information
  • Probation or parole officers
  • A state agency which needs the information to license an individual
  • Employers, under limited circumstances authorized by law

With the increasing computerization of records, however, information brokers are able to compile what amounts to a “rap sheet” by searching arrest records and court files that are public records. This information is sometimes used by employers to run background checks on prospective employees. Such records can be obtained from Internet-based information broker services.

4. Federal Privacy Laws

The two main federal privacy laws are the Privacy Act of 1974 and the Freedom of Information Act. They apply only to federal government agencies. At first glance, the two laws seem diametrically opposed. The Privacy Act deals with keeping government records about individuals confidential, and the Freedom of Information Act is commonly used to pry open government files. However, these laws are attempts to balance the public’s right to know about the actions of government with the rights of an individual to retain his or her privacy. (Legal cites are located at the end of this guide.)

The Privacy Act gives an individual the right to:

  • See and copy files that the federal government maintains on him or her
  • Find out who else has had access to the information
  • And request a change in any information that is not accurate or relevant

A government agency is required to:

  • Respond to a request for information within 10 days; notify the public about the types of files they maintain via the Federal Register; inform the public how they use the information; make sure the information in files is relevant
  • Not use the information for any purpose other than the one for which it was initially collected

Government files on an individual may be opened to others in a few cases including:

  • A purpose similar to the original reason for collecting the information
  • For statistical research
  • For law enforcement purposes
  • When ordered by a court
  • If it is medically necessary for the requester to have access to the information

There is no central index of federal government records about individuals. If you want to look at your records, you must first identify which agency has them. Then use the Privacy Act to ask to see your files. The agency must respond to your request within 10 days. You may be charged a “reasonable” fee for copying the file.

You may be denied access to government records about you if they involve:

  • Law enforcement activities
  • The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA)
  • Litigation
  • Civil service exams (to the extent access would affect the fairness of the tests)
  • Confidential government sources

If you are denied access to your records, you can appeal in court. You may also take a government agency to court if you believe it has improperly disclosed information about you or if you want to block impending disclosures.

The Freedom of Information Act was designed to help individuals obtain information about the actions of government. It requires that citizens be given access to government records unless disclosure involves:

  • Litigation
  • The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA)
  • Internal agency memos
  • Personnel matters
  • Trade secrets
  • Classified documents
  • Law enforcement activities
  • Confidential government sources
  • Violating an individual’s privacy interests
  • Civil service exams (to the extent it would affect the fairness of the tests)

The agency has 20 days to make a determination on a request for access. If you are denied, you may appeal the denial either within the agency itself or in court.
5. California Privacy Laws

California has two state laws which are similar to federal privacy legislation: the Information Practices Act and the Public Records Act. (The legal citations are found at the end of this guide.)

The California Information Practices Act applies only to state agencies. It is similar to the federal Privacy Act and gives individuals access to information about them held by state agencies. However, the Information Practices Act does not require the state to publish a list of the type of records agencies create.

If you request information, the state agency must respond within 30 to 60 days. You can be denied access to your records for the same reasons as under the Privacy Act. If a request is denied, you must be told the reason for the denial. You can appeal the decision in court.

If you find incorrect information in a record the state keeps about you, you have the right to amend your file. The agency must note in the record that you dispute its accuracy.

The Information Practices Act does not cover city or county government records. Local governments are free to make their own laws in this area.

The California Public Records Act is similar to the federal Freedom of Information Act and covers state, city and county boards, special districts, commissions, agencies and school districts. With a few exceptions, all records from these bodies are considered public documents. The major exemptions from public disclosure include:

  • Personnel matter
  • Medical records
  • Tax records
  • Litigation
  • Public library records
  • Preliminary drafts, notes, or memos
  • Complaints or investigations by law enforcement authorities unless the person requesting the information is involved in the crime or suspected crime
  • Information which would compromise civil service exams

If you request information under the California Public Records Act, the agency must let you know within 10 days that it has received your request. If your request is denied, you must be notified within 10 days and given the reason the information is not being released. You have the right to appeal such decisions in court.

6. Policy Considerations

Traditionally, public records were obtained by visiting the appropriate government agency and inspecting or copying them there. But Internet access to government records is increasing. Consumers should be aware of the growing public policy debate over the availability of government records online. While such records have always been public, Internet access is making them easier to gather and compile, both by individual citizens and by a variety of institutional users. Information brokers, direct marketers, employers, private investigators, law enforcement officers and other government agencies are finding new ways to use this information.

Should public records, including sensitive court files like divorce records and insurance cases containing medical information, be freely available by anyone via the Internet? The issue of online access to public records will be an increasingly significant privacy concern in the coming years. For additional information on this matter, read the PRC’s Public Records on the Internet: the Privacy Dilemma andThe Privacy Advisor (May 1, 2012) Assessing Public Information in the Digital Age.

7. Resources

The information in this Fact Sheet covers only the most common government records. There are a number of other government agencies that may contain information about you. For example, various local, state and federal agencies license individuals for certain professions, and many of these records are open to the public.

A useful guide to federal government information is Your Right to Federal Records, GSA Federal Citizen Information Center (November 2009).www.pueblo.gsa.gov/cic_text/fed_prog/foia/foia.htm

The California Public Records Act is explained in Access to Public Records in California,” Citizen Media Law Project www.citmedialaw.org/legal-guide/california/access-public-records-california

Individuals may obtain a copy of their criminal record by writing to the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Include a letter stating why you are making the request, a set of fingerprints and a money order (no checks) for $18. Mail to: FBI, Criminal Justice Information Services Div., 1000 Custer Hollow Rd., Clarksburg, WV 26306. Telephone: (304) 625-3878. Web: www.fbi.gov/hq/cjisd/fprequest.htm

Individuals who do not have a criminal record can make a request under the Freedom of Information Act to determine if the FBI has compiled information about them. The request must be in writing and should include a complete name, address, date and place of birth and notarized signature. It should be sent to FBI, Freedom of Information Privacy Section, at the same address and telephone number as the previous paragraph.

On the state level, to receive a copy of your “rap” sheet (record of arrests and prosecutions), contact the California Attorney General. Write to: California Department of Justice, Record Review Unit, P.O. Box 903417, Sacramento, CA 94203-7410. Telephone: (916) 227-3832. Send a $25 for the processing fee, plus 10-print fingerpint card, name, date of birth, gender, address, and letter stating purpose of request. Web: http://ag.ca.gov/fingerprints/security.php.

For additional information on California birth, death and marriage certificates, contact: Center for Health Statistics, California Department of Public Health, Office of Vital Records, P.O. Box 997410, Sacramento, CA 95899-7410. Telephone: (916) 445-2684 (recorded message). Web:http://www.cdph.ca.gov/certlic/birthdeathmar/Pages/ContactUs.aspx

Legal citations for federal and state laws on government records are as follows:

Federal laws: (www.law.cornell.edu/uscode)

Privacy Act of 1974, 5 USC, § 552a.
Freedom of Information Act, 5 USC, § 552.
Family Educational Rights & Privacy Act (FERPA), 20 USC § 1232

California state laws: (www.leginfo.ca.gov/calaw.html)

Information Practices Act, Calif. Civil Code, § 1798.
Public Records Act, Calif. Government Code, § 6250.